The Last Goodbye

The feeling that something was very wrong overwhelmed me. I had just returned a school pony back to her mountainside paddock when I “heard” a cry for help. I glanced down a  nearby shed row of stalls. Nothing seemed out of place so I started back down the mountain. Again, I sensed something was not right. I hiked back up to the top paddock which housed two pregnant mares. I carefully stepped into the paddock and checked each one over. Both stood happily grazing on a flake of hay, oblivious to my concern about them. I ran my hand over their expanding bellies and asked each one the gender of her foal. One was to have a colt, the other a filly. ( A few months later, each gave birth to the gender they revealed to me! ) Satisfied that all was well,  I started my way back down the hill when I was hit with the knowledge that something was definitely wrong. Again I was “hearing” a cry for help. This time it was more urgent. Immediately I headed to the shed row of stalls.

Dandy stood hunched up, shaking violently in a cold sweat. I Immediately haltered him and began to check him over. His pulse was racing and his gum color was white. I clipped a lead to his halter and tried to get him to the main barn. He wouldn’t budge. He began to shake harder, then tried to lay down. Thinking this must be a colic gone very wrong, I began shouting to people down at the barn to call the vet. I continued to encourage Dandy to move forward, but he refused. After what seemed like an eternity, I finally got Dandy down the hill and began homeopathic remedies to keep him stable until he could be seen by the vet. Once the vet arrived, she used heroic measures to help stabilize Dandy. A plan was then put into place to treat an internal infection.  One of the many roles I had at this farm was to assist the veterinarian and to deliver prescribed treatments. Dandy was to receive a daily dose of IV antibiotics over the course of a week,  then be reevaluated.

Dandy was an aged school horse whose rides were few and far between. His temperament only suited the most experienced riders. Because of this, he was never the first pick to be ridden. Most days, Dandy stood patiently in his mountainside paddock waiting for someone to give him attention. Due to a serious fly bite allergy, Dandy’s body was often scarred and bloody which contributed to his overall difficult and sad demeanor. Each day, I hiked up the mountain to give Dandy his medication. Although constantly busy juggling rides and lessons, I always carved out enough time to give Dandy more attention than just his required treatment. I would brush his rough coat, treat his fly bite allergies, then finish by giving him his IV injection. We bonded. But despite Dandy’s treatment, his condition worsened. It was decided, in Dandy’s best interest, that he be euthanized.

When the day arrived, I asked the farm owner if she wanted me to be the one to help him transition. After all, he trusted me. However, she chose to spare me the additional sadness. I knew I must say good-bye to this very brave horse.

I hiked to his mountainside stall dreading what was to come. Dandy looked defeated, but his eyes brightened as he saw me. I slipped my arms around his neck and told him how brave he was. That he would soon be young again with no pain, running across green pastures. And with that, I slipped out of his stall and his life forever.

An hour later I ran into the farm owner. Dandy had gone peacefully, but still, we both cried. I asked her if she was doing “okay.” She said she had been having a very hard time until Dandy “came” to her with a message. He thanked her. He told her he was young again running across green pastures. Shock washed over me to the point I had to sit down.

I was the ONLY person on that mountain when I spoke to Dandy that morning. I had told no one of my conversation with him. To this day, this remains one of the most powerful stories of animal communication I have ever experienced.

 

 

Signs

Isn’t it interesting that it usually takes a life altering event to start asking the universe for signs regarding your future. You may ask for a yellow butterfly to appear as a “sign” that everything will be okay or know that when a red cardinal arrives it means spirit is close. Comfort is found immediately when the signs you are asking for start appearing like magic.

But, did you know that receiving signs are all in your own power? By placing the “intention” of seeing something specific into the universe, you are actually creating just that. Grasp this, our brains process 400 billion ( that’s Billion with a capital B! ) bits of information per second. Out of that information our brain ONLY processes 2000 of those. Those bits of information create familiar patterns which in turn creates our reality. Wow.

As you wrap your mind around that information, grasp this too … 95% of our brain activity is beyond our conscious awareness. That leaves just 5% of our cognitive activities ( such as decisions, actions, emotions and behavior ) as conscious.

SO, how does all this affect your reality?  Your thoughts, emotions and beliefs create your reality in every moment. So if 95% of your brain is actively working to create your reality, the question is how do you change that. Manifesting ones destiny is simply utilizing the creative forces of the subconscious mind by directing it into the future. Who we think we are as people and how the world operates will be directly reflected back to us in the events of our lives. By identifying and actively changing our thoughts we in turn change our beliefs which then creates our reality.

Take for example the belief ” I am good enough.” If you question this consciously,  no doubt your subconscious has created a belief behind it. Now put into play that your subconscious brain is running the show. If your subconscious brain does not “Believe” you are good enough, imagine how that affects and shapes your entire life. By identifying the beliefs that are weak and changing them, you in turn change your entire reality.

Now, let’s add in trapped emotions. If your body does not fully process an emotion and it gets stuck within the physical body, that emotion will “play out” within your subconscious mind. Take for example “anxiety.” If your body has trapped this emotion, your body will attract more of the same unknowingly to your conscious body. These trapped emotions build up over time and create familiar patterns from which your body operates. These trapped emotions can affect you on both an emotional and physical level. Emotionally your body will be “anxious.” Physically your body will suffer in the place your trapped emotion is caught. This could be in an organ, bone, or even your skin. Our bodies are amazing machines and are constantly working to heal themselves. Trapped emotions are always trying to get out of the body either by sickness or injury. When trapped emotions build up over time within the body, the body will begin to suffer. By identifying and clearing your trapped emotions you are then restoring your body to better health.

How do these trapped emotions affect your pet? Not only can your pet can trap their own emotions through a traumatic experience or other life event, they can take on your trapped emotions to help ease your suffering. If both you and your pet have emotions trapped, those emotions can “trigger” each other causing the emotion to surface in life events. It is imperative to identify and clear trapped emotions in both the owner and pet to help alleviate the issues at hand. This creates a type of “clean slate” for both owner and animal to operate and move forward from.

So, the next time you you are faced with a negative situation, before reacting, STOP AND THINK! Ask yourself which emotion would serve you better, a negative or positive one. YOU have the power to create your own reality. Choose wisely.

 

Hijacked

I am a firm believer that the messages that come through at the time of a reading are meant to be. No doubt, to keep me on my toes, I run across the occasional animal that likes to hijack a session.

This was the case while working with a successful holistic vet in Montana. Taking a break from working on some of her harder cases, I was asked if I could check in with one of her personal dogs named Silas. Immediately a little brown dog came into focus and started conveying some very specific physical problems. Silas indicated that his right ear had deep pain that radiated throughout his jaw. In addition, he pointed out that he had a hard time swallowing and that he couldn’t feel his tail due to numbness.

As I relayed the information to his owner I was met with a picture of the dog I connected to via text. Laughingly, the vet told me I had just read her dog Foxy Brown and not the intended Silas. Dr. Knock Kreige went on to confirm that Foxy Brown had a bad tooth infection on the right side of her jaw coupled with a severe ear infection on the same side. The symptoms that I picked up in the throat and tail were due to a neurological condition called myasthenia gravis. (This is a rare chronic autoimmune disease marked by muscle weakness.  I am familiar with this disease as my personal corgi Banjo suffers from it. ) Foxy Brown seized the opportunity to connect with me to help pass on her symptoms to her owner.

A few days later, one of the vets personal horses King Clover requested a warm dry stall. Although this was a drastic contrast to the mountain pasture he so enjoyed, efforts were made to accommodate his wishes. As King and his pasture mate Zeb came in for dinner, King turned on his heals and thundered off leaving behind Zeb who happily settled into  the stall. The vet confirmed that Zeb had been used to these accommodations in Kentucky prior to her ownership of him. We never knew if King requested the stall for his friend or if it was indeed Zeb who hijacked the read. However, the message that needed to come through at the time was the one I picked up on.

While working with a prominent race horse trainer in Miami, I was asked to check in with one of her horses prior to his race. I was immediately confronted with what I interpreted as a very sick horse. I physically picked up on a immense amount of congestion in his lungs and an overall feeling of malaise. When I relayed this information the trainer was confused because the horse was an absolute picture of health. She communicated this to me, but added that I had just described the symptoms the horse’s jockey had been experiencing. The horse, it turned out was extremely close to his rider and was worried about him. This was conveyed to the jockey who then reassured his mount that he was well enough for the ride.

The universe always knows what messages need to come through at the time of a read no matter who the messenger is.

Timing Is Everything

It was a Tuesday night in late spring when I was sent a frantic message about a dog that seemingly went missing into thin air.  Bruno, a beautiful dappled dachshund had been playing with his other canine companions on the horse farm he resided on. When his caretaker called to bring him inside, he was gone. Frenzied efforts were made to locate him, but to no avail. It wasn’t until early Wednesday morning when I received the text. I immediately went to work trying to “connect” with him.

My first impressions were that Bruno was locked in a car and he couldn’t get out. Efforts were made to check all vehicles in and around the farm to make sure he hadn’t crawled inside and gotten stuck. There was no sign of him. Emergency measures were taken. Signs were made, neighbors were notified, calls to vets and shelters, but again Bruno was no where to be found. The only information Bruno continued to relay to me was that he was stuck in a car and that he could not get out. However, there were no leads in this direction.

The search continued without me until just the right moment on Friday morning in which I had time to check in with him and work and test the maps on my computer. Bruno indicated to me that he traveled south on the property looking for his human mom who had traveled south for a horse show. Testing the maps, I pinpointed a farm just south of the property he lived on and instructed his caretaker to check it out. She left instantly, however turned up nothing. I IMMEDIATELY sent her back out and told her, she had to talk to the farm help, a man who doesn’t speak English. I knew this man wasn’t “reading” the signs posted.

AND that was the break in the case! The caretaker met the help from the nearby farm as he left. The man ONLY frequented the nearby farm 20 minutes a day to feed the chickens. This was such a small window of opportunity for the two to interact. He had seen two girls pick up Bruno at the end of his farm driveway Tuesday night and drive away. He was able to describe the truck and the girls. Hurriedly, the caretaker called me to ask what to do. Social media I exclaimed!  And within the hour, a woman called from PENNSYLVANIA to say her two working students had picked up the dog and drove it all the way up north ( this is why Bruno kept relaying he was stuck in a car and couldn’t get out! ) and didn’t tell anyone. Immediate efforts were made to return the dog and he was returned within the week leaving us all with quite the story to tell.

Heartbroken

Finally, a moment to take my friend up on her invitation to see her dressage pony. Prince boarded at a nearby farm in which grand prix jumpers resided. I couldn’t wait.

Not having met Prince in person yet, I was happy to meet his acquaintance as his mom went about readying him for her lesson. Several weeks before, the strikingly handsome lad had shared with me some tidbits of information that had stunned and amazed his mom. As he now stood in the crossties, he silently told me his teeth were sharp. Slipping my fingers into his mouth I was met with some rather sharp edges, so I added it to his ever increasing “list” of things to address.

As I watched Prince prance through his paces, my eyes caught sight of a large grey horse being jumped in the middle of the arena.  As the rider approached the fence, the horse would throw itself to the other side, landing and scooting away as fast as possible. Having ridden jumpers most of my life, I stopped to focus on the ride.  A friend of Prince’s mom came to stand next to me and casually asked ” Do you know what’s wrong with that horse?” Without missing a beat, I answered ” SHE hurts, it’s her ovaries.” The woman, mouth agape turns to me and said “How do you KNOW that?!” I took a minute. How did I know that? I hadn’t even known this was a mare. She went on to tell me that the owner had tried EVERYTHING to help this horse. That the mare had such bad hormonal problems and were at a loss of what to do next. I knew I had to help her.

Once the owner was off her horse and properly introduced to me and my work, I went about reading other horses in the barn. However, I really felt the need to work on this mare. Her name was Saba. As I tapped into her, I immediately picked up the pain she had in her ovaries, specifically the left. Her owner confirmed that this one was worse than the other. I quickly went about identifying and releasing any trapped emotions she had caught in her body. It was no surprise that all resided in her ovaries. However all  had been caught 3 years prior. As I continued my communication with Saba she exuded sadness. It just poured out of her. I was drained. I asked why she was so sad. She told me she lost a baby. I turned to her owner and said ” Saba said she lost a baby.” The owners face turned pale. Her mouth opened, then closed, then opened again. I looked from person to person for a clue to what was going on. Her owner spoke up. “She had an embryo transfer.”(This is when a horse is bred and the embryo is removed and placed in another mare to carry.)

Saba spoke to me again. She didn’t know the baby was gone and held on for over two years thinking she’d have it. When she didn’t give birth she became heartbroken. Her owner quickly showed me pictures of her beautiful, healthy baby, now three years old. I went about explaining to Saba that her baby was alive and well and that one day she’d have a foal of her own to raise. The emotions she trapped over the heart break had resided in her ovaries thus causing hormonal problems and pain. I hoped by releasing these trapped emotions, that I would help Saba’s overall hormonal problems.

Two years later, the owner is trying to abide by Saba’s wishes and allow her to become a mom and raise a foal on her own.

This Little Piggie

If you ever want to upset the proverbial apple cart, get a pig. From the minute this little oinker found his way into our lives, it has never been the same.

A social media post from a friend brought this little guy into our lives. Far from a domestic pig, this tiny squealer was a baby hog abandoned by his mom on a nearby horse farm. Weighing in at only a couple of pounds and taking milk in by a syringe, we quickly fell in love with this tiny piglet. Wanting to stay far away from the typical pig names, such as Kevin Bacon, Hamlet, Hogwarts and the rest, we settled on the more regal name of  Xander. We may or may not always call him that. Piggle wiggle or Pig, Pig, Pig is often used in reference when addressing him. Looks like the name Xander will be reserved for when he gets scolded or upon graduating.

Although our new found “pet” was endearing to us, we failed to consider the impact it may have on the rest of our menagerie. I noticed the immediate impact it had on my corgi Banjo as Xander entered our household. ” You’ve got to be kidding me! Another pet.” Banjo glared at me not amused and immediately excused himself from anything having to do with the swine.  Tuesday and Kiki however met Xander with enthusiasm and interest. ” A new friend!” They couldn’t get enough interaction with this new little man. We won’t even discuss our cat Oscar.

The human dynamics in the household quickly changed too. We now had a piglet occupying a guest bathroom that needed to be fed every two hours. As Xander got comfortable in his new surroundings, he also got comfortable making his new living space his own. His pee pads that originally housed whatever contents he excreted, now were the subject of play toys as he carried them around the bathroom stuffing them into his cage and bed. A box that contained rocks to root in were quickly rearranged in all areas and you can only imagine what he liked to do with an entire roll of toilet paper! As captivating as many of these antics were, as his size grew, so did the chores to keep up. It was soon decided the barn would be his new home.

A whole new world opened up as Xander became an outdoor pig. He soon joined all three dogs for daily walks on our large horse farm. His first introduction to the horses, one he decided to take on his own, went without issue. However subsequent visits have given him reasons to stay far away from the wide eyed beasts with their snorts and thundering hooves. Xanders new living quarters, a large 12 X 12 horse stall includes all the amenities a pig could ever want. He has his own swimming pool to wallow in, a hay filled cage in which he can sleep in if he chooses and a variety of toys to carry, bounce or play with in his free time. However, it is without a doubt Xanders time with us that is his favorite. He greets up with hardy grunts, squeals and oinks and happily rubs up against with affection each time he sees us.

All sorts of lessons can be learned from your animals. Xander has taught us this, never judge a book by it’s cover and never assume that what people have deemed as stereotypical behavior is true. While thinking we rescued Xander, he is the one rescuing us, giving us gifts we can never repay.

The filly that could

Sierra’s Sweedie was the first baby born on our farm, which that in itself made her very special. She spent most of her growing up years on our first farm, turned out with the rest of the herd. Every night, we’d call to the horses and every night, the herd would run in from somewhere on the 200 acres and put themselves “away” in their stalls. Sweedie however made this a game. One we didn’t truly understand until she started her race horse career. As the herd of horses would thunder in across the fields, Sweedie would stand at the top of the hill and wait until all of the horses were well out in front and then she would turn on the speed and race past everyone claiming her place as the winner. This happened from the time she was weaned from her mom, until the time we started training her at 2 years of age. Looking back now, she had placed herself into her own training program, well before we did.

Sweedie turned out to be super athletic. She was big and powerful and boy did she like to run. Because hunters and jumpers were our primary business, we employed a trainer to teach her to race. She excelled quickly, was purchased by some friends of ours and was sent up north to start her formal race horse career. From the get go, Sweedie’s M.O. was racing at the back of the pack until the stretch when she would pour on the speed, passing everyone in her wake. With each race we waited with baited breath and watched in excitement as she made her move. However as well as she ran, she had yet to win a race.

One race in particular, Sweedie stumbled out of the gate, getting a late start and then didn’t seem to run her usual race. This time, she stayed at the back of the pack. We immediately thought she must be hurt and that the jockey must be holding her back. Then all of a sudden, you could see her shake her head, and pour on the speed, racing past several horses trying to catch up. We later found out that she had smacked her head in the starting gate. It must have stunned her pretty hard, as the jockey said she wasn’t with it for most of the race, but then all of a sudden, she “woke up” looked around, realized she was in a race and then ran her heart out coming in second. To make the story even more amazing, we later found out that she had broken loose from the pony horse and had lapped the track at full speed with her jockey prior to the race. She had that kind of heart.

After several races, all in the money, Sweedie unfortunately came up with an injured suspensory. Her owners retired her and returned her back to us. We had no intention on racing her again, but we were determined to make her sound. So we took our time, spending a year doctoring and resting her leg. We started with small sessions on her back, mostly trotting to strengthen the long forgotten muscles. Sweedie was thrilled by the attention and the rides and as she grew stronger, she hashed out her own plan. We spent months trotting her. She was in incredible shape and completely sound. However she wanted to gallop, so we employed a neighboring exercise rider to ride her lightly on the track. But as the days turned into weeks and Sweedie grew stronger, you could  obviously see the light in her eyes had returned. She wanted to race.

We decided to send her to a trainer at Calder race track in Miami. Within two weeks, she was ready for her comeback race. As we excitedly made our way to the track  my husband Chris urgently nudged me towards Sweedie’s barn to give her a “pep” talk prior to the race. I approached her stall. She already had her “game face” on.  I stroked her mane, told her how proud we were of her and to just do her best. And for the first time since she was born, she responded to me. She told me “she knew what she needed to do and was going to do her best to win!”

With that, I excitedly took off to the paddock to watch nervously with the trainer and the rest of the family. Boy was Sweedie excited … she danced nervously through the paddock, actually tramping the shrubs lining the mounting area. The jockey looked terrified. To make matters worse, she refused to trot next to the pony horse, constantly trying to break away. ( We later found out this poor jockey wet his pants prior to the race! ) This did not look good, however we remained hopeful.

And then they were off. Sweedie broke well from the starting gate, running along side her strongest contender, when all of a sudden, the contender veered left through a small break in the rail and then through a barricade losing her jockey in the mix. Sweedie, never faltered, even as the loose horse rejoined the field minus her jockey. Sweedie ran her race as she had always done. We watched in amazement as she approached the finish line and then held our breathes as she won the race!

Thrilled, we made quite the scene running to the paddock to congratulate our horse. And do you know what, Sweedie was smiling, she was beaming. She couldn’t have been more proud of herself in that moment, standing tall for the pictures, receiving pats and praise from family, grooms and trainers. She had done it. She had waited for this moment and here it was. She had saved the win for us.